Lately, I was really busy, I can't update my blog. So now maybe this blog is dead. Just kidding, what I mean is that this blog may will not active anymore like it was, because of my real life problem. But now because i've a mini free-time I just want to share a sample of the golden ratio...

Golden ratio

Lately, I was really busy, I can't update my blog. So now maybe this blog is dead. Just kidding, what I mean is that this blog may will not active anymore like it was, because of my real life problem. But now because i've a mini free-time I just want to share a sample of the golden ratio...

Definition

In mathematics, two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the two quantities. Expressed algebraically, for quantities a and b with a > b > 0. Golden ratio number is 1.618. Some people believes that this irrational number is a god number.

In art world

This number has always been considered as a very important number in art world. For example, a lot of architect and designer are using this number as a concept for making a good design. And the figure i've made at the top was created with CSS and golden ratio, I use 6.18 as the width and 38.2 as the height.

History

The golden ratio has been claimed to have held a special fascination for at least 2,400 years, though without reliable evidence. According to Mario Livio:
"Some of the greatest mathematical minds of all ages, from Pythagoras and Euclid in ancient Greece, through the medieval Italian mathematician Leonardo of Pisa and the Renaissance astronomer Johannes Kepler, to present-day scientific figures such as Oxford physicist Roger Penrose, have spent endless hours over this simple ratio and its properties. But the fascination with the Golden Ratio is not confined just to mathematicians. Biologists, artists, musicians, historians, architects, psychologists, and even mystics have pondered and debated the basis of its ubiquity and appeal. In fact, it is probably fair to say that the Golden Ratio has inspired thinkers of all disciplines like no other number in the history of mathematics."
The first known approximation of the (inverse) golden ratio by a decimal fraction, stated as "about 0.6180340", was written in 1597 by Michael Maestlin of the University of Tübingen in a letter to his former student Johannes Kepler. Since the 20th century, the golden ratio has been represented by the Greek letter φ (phi, after Phidias, a sculptor who is said to have employed it) or less commonly by τ (tau, the first letter of the ancient Greek root τομή—meaning cut).